Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/9230
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dc.contributor.authorHamilton, PB-
dc.contributor.authorNicol, E-
dc.contributor.authorDe-Bastos, ESR-
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, RJ-
dc.contributor.authorSumpter, JP-
dc.contributor.authorJobling, S-
dc.contributor.authorStevens, JR-
dc.contributor.authorTyler, CR-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-25T10:57:38Z-
dc.date.available2014-01-13-
dc.date.available2014-11-25T10:57:38Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Biology, 12(1): (2014)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1741-7007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/9230-
dc.descriptionThis is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Treated effluents from wastewater treatment works can comprise a large proportion of the flow of rivers in the developed world. Exposure to these effluents, or the steroidal estrogens they contain, feminizes wild male fish and can reduce their reproductive fitness. Long-term experimental exposures have resulted in skewed sex ratios, reproductive failures in breeding colonies, and population collapse. This suggests that environmental estrogens could threaten the sustainability of wild fish populations.Results: Here we tested this hypothesis by examining population genetic structures and effective population sizes (Ne) of wild roach (Rutilus rutilus L.) living in English rivers contaminated with estrogenic effluents. Ne was estimated from DNA microsatellite genotypes using approximate Bayesian computation and sibling assignment methods. We found no significant negative correlation between Ne and the predicted estrogen exposure at 28 sample sites. Furthermore, examination of the population genetic structure of roach in the region showed that some populations have been confined to stretches of river with a high proportion of estrogenic effluent for multiple generations and have survived, apparently without reliance on immigration of fish from less polluted sites.Conclusions: These results demonstrate that roach populations living in some effluent-contaminated river stretches, where feminization is widespread, are self-sustaining. Although we found no evidence to suggest that exposure to estrogenic effluents is a significant driving factor in determining the size of roach breeding populations, a reduction in Ne of up to 65% is still possible for the most contaminated sites because of the wide confidence intervals associated with the statistical model. © 2014 Hamilton et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNatural Environmental Research Council (NERC) grant numbers NE/G019355/1 and NE/K004263/1 and the Environment Agency (England and Wales).en_US
dc.languageeng-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectDNA microsatellitesen_US
dc.subjectEcotoxicologyen_US
dc.subjectFisheryen_US
dc.subjectGenetic diversityen_US
dc.subjectWaste water treatment worken_US
dc.titlePopulations of a cyprinid fish are self-sustaining despite widespread feminization of malesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1741-7007-12-1-
dc.relation.isPartOfBMC Biology-
dc.relation.isPartOfBMC Biology-
pubs.volume12-
pubs.volume12-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Staff by College/Department/Division-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Staff by College/Department/Division/College of Health and Life Sciences-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Staff by College/Department/Division/College of Health and Life Sciences/Dept of Life Sciences-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Staff by College/Department/Division/College of Health and Life Sciences/Dept of Life Sciences/Biological Sciences-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Staff by Institute/Theme-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Staff by Institute/Theme/Institute of Environmental, Health and Societies-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Staff by Institute/Theme/Institute of Environmental, Health and Societies/Health and Environment-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Specialist Centres-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Specialist Centres/IfE-
Appears in Collections:Institute for the Environment

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