Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7971
Title: From dictatorship to a reluctant democracy: Stroke therapists talking about self-management
Authors: Norris, M
Kilbride, C
Keywords: Qualitative;Self-management;Stroke;Therapists
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Informa Healthcare
Citation: Disability and Rehabilitation, 36(1), 32-38, 2014
Abstract: Purpose: Self-management is being increasingly promoted within chronic conditions including stroke. Concerns have been raised regarding professional ownership of some programmes, yet little is known of the professional’s experience. This paper aims to present the views of trained therapists about the utility of a specific self-management approach in stroke rehabilitation. Method: Eleven stroke therapists trained in the self-management approach participated in semi-structured interviews. These were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Results: Two overriding themes emerged. The first was the sense that in normal practice therapists act as ‘‘benign dictators’’, committed to help their patients, but most comfortable when they, the professional, are in control. Following the adoption of the self-management approach therapists challenged themselves to empower stroke survivors to take control of their own recovery. However, therapists had to confront many internal and external challenges in this transition of power resulting in the promotion of a somewhat ‘‘reluctant democracy’’. Conclusions: This study illustrates that stroke therapists desire a more participatory approach to rehabilitation. However, obstacles challenged the successful delivery of this goal. If self-management is an appropriate model to develop in post stroke pathways, then serious consideration must be given to how and if these obstacles can be overcome.
Description: This article is made available through the Brunel Open Access Publishing Fund.
URI: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09638288.2013.776645
http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7971
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2013.776645
ISSN: 0963-8288
Appears in Collections:Community Health and Public Health
Physiotherapy
Brunel OA Publishing Fund
Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Notice.pdf25.98 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in BURA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.