Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7772
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dc.contributor.authorYoung, W-
dc.contributor.authorHollands, MA-
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-09T11:36:35Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-09T11:36:35Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 7(11), e49765, 2012en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7772-
dc.description© 2012 Young, Hollands. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis opportune case study describes visual and stepping behaviours of an 87 year old female (P8), both prior to, and following two falls. Before falling, when asked to walk along a path containing two stepping guides positioned before and after an obstacle, P8 generally visually fixated the first stepping guide until after foot contact inside it. However, after falling P8 consistently looked away from the stepping guide before completing the step into it in order to fixate the upcoming obstacle in her path. The timing of gaze redirection away from the target (in relation to foot contact inside it) correlated with absolute stepping error. No differences in eyesight, cognitive function, or balance were found between pre- and post-fall recordings. However, P8 did report large increases in fall-related anxiety and reduced balance confidence, supporting previously suggested links between anxiety/increased fear or falling and maladaptive visual/stepping behaviours. The results represent a novel insight into how psychological and related behavioural factors can change in older adults following a fall, and provide a possible partial rationalisation for why recent fallers are more likely to fall again in the following 12 months. These findings highlight novel possibilities for falls prevention and rehabilitation.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.titleNewly acquired fear of falling leads to altered eye movement patterns and reduced stepping safety: A case studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0049765-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Active Staff-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Active Staff/School of Sport & Education-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Active Staff/School of Sport & Education/Sport-
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Dept of Life Sciences Research Papers

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