Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7747
Title: Harnessing motivation to alleviate neglect
Authors: Russell, C
Li, K
Malhotra, PA
Keywords: Attention;Extinction;Motivation;Music;Neglect;Reward;Striatum
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: Frontiers
Citation: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 7, 230, 2013
Abstract: The syndrome of spatial neglect results from the combination of a number of deficits in attention, with patients demonstrating both spatially lateralized and non-lateralized impairments. Previous reports have hinted that there may be a motivational component to neglect and that modulating this might alleviate some of the debilitating symptoms. Additionally, recent work on the effects of reward on attention in healthy participants has revealed improvements across a number of paradigms. As the primary deficit in neglect has been associated with attention, this evidence for reward's effects is potentially important. However, until very recently there have been few empirical studies addressing this potential therapeutic avenue. Here we review the growing body of evidence that attentional impairments in neglect can be reduced by motivation, for example in the form of preferred music or anticipated monetary reward, and discuss the implications of this for treatments for these patients. Crucially these effects of positive motivation are not observed in all patients with neglect, suggesting that the consequences of motivation may relate to individual lesion anatomy. Given the key role of dopaminergic systems in motivational processes, we suggest that motivational stimulation might act as a surrogate for dopaminergic stimulation. In addition, we consider the relationship between clinical post stroke apathy and lack of response to motivation.
Description: This article is made available through the Brunel Open Access Publishing Fund. Copyright: © 2013 Russell, Li and Malhotra. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and subject to any copyright notices concerning any third-party graphics etc.
URI: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23761744
http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7747
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00230
ISSN: 1662-5161
Appears in Collections:Publications
Brunel OA Publishing Fund
Psychology
Dept of Life Sciences Research Papers

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Fulltext.pdf720.66 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in BURA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.