Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7011
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dc.contributor.authorShah, SM-
dc.contributor.authorCarey, IM-
dc.contributor.authorHarris, TJ-
dc.contributor.authorDeWilde, S-
dc.contributor.authorVictor, CR-
dc.contributor.authorCook, DG-
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-12T11:37:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-12T11:37:50Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Epidemiology, 176(8): 689-698, Oct 2012en_US
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/176/8/689en
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/7011-
dc.descriptionThis is an open access Article. Copyright @ 2012 The Authorsen_US
dc.description.abstractAn increased risk of death in persons who have suffered spousal bereavement has been described in many populations. The impact of modifying factors, such as chronic disease and material circumstances, is less well understood. The authors followed 171,120 couples 60 years of age or older in a United Kingdom primary care database between 2005 and 2010 for an average of 4 years. A total of 26,646 (15.5%) couples experienced bereavement, with mean follow up after bereavement of 2 years. In a model adjusted for age, sex, comorbid conditions at baseline, material deprivation based on area of residence, season, and smoking status, the hazard ratio for mortality in the first year after bereavement was 1.25 (95% confidence interval: 1.18, 1.33). Further adjustment for changes in comorbid conditions throughout follow up did not alter the hazard ratio for bereavement (hazard ratio = 1.27, 95% confidence interval: 1.19, 1.35). The association was strongest in individuals with no significant chronic comorbid conditions throughout follow up (hazard ratio = 1.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.28, 1.77) and in more affluent couples (P = 0.035). In the first year after bereavement, the association between bereavement and death is not primarily mediated through worsening or new onset of chronic disease. Good health and material circumstances do not protect individuals from increased mortality rates after bereavement.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by a grant from the Dunhill Medical Trust.en_US
dc.languageEnglish-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Healthen_US
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectBereavementen_US
dc.subjectComorbid conditionsen_US
dc.subjectMortalityen_US
dc.titleDo good health and material circumstances protect older people from the increased risk of death after bereavement?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2012-201753.085-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Active Staff-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Active Staff/School of Health Sciences & Social Care-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/Brunel Active Staff/School of Health Sciences & Social Care/Health-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/University Research Centres and Groups-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/University Research Centres and Groups/School of Engineering and Design - URCs and Groups-
pubs.organisational-data/Brunel/University Research Centres and Groups/School of Engineering and Design - URCs and Groups/Research Centre for Engineering Tribology and Dynamics-
Appears in Collections:Publications
Community Health and Public Health
Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

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