Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/15137
Title: Effects of collaborative learning on the achievement of students with different learning styles at Qatar University
Authors: Al-kaabi, Aisha Fadl
Advisors: Watts, M
Hossain, S
Keywords: Higher education;Kolb's learning style;Blended learning;Cooperative learning;Community of enquiry
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Brunel University London
Abstract: In this research, collaborative learning techniques were designed to examine their influence on the achievement of students with different learning styles at Qatar University (QU). One important issue was whether collaborative learning in a blended learning environment had a major impact on students' achievements and skills irrespective of their learning styles. Furthermore, this research investigated other learning styles to show the importance of collaborative learning on students’ achievements and skills. Qatar University has chosen as a case study; research was conducted on 81 students, aged between 19 and 22. The students, who were on a research methods course, were divided into three different branches where each branch contained the same number of students: the control group (C), the first experimental group (E1) and the second experimental group (E2). In the control group, each student worked separately. The first experimental group was divided into small groups of students who each had a different learning style. The second experimental group was also divided into four groups with the students in each group having the same learning style. The two experimental groups followed the course through collaborative learning, as well as traditional learning. The students were asked to fill in a pre-questionnaire three times in order to distinguish their learning styles, and some of them were eliminated from the analysis process due to instability in their learning style across the three responses. The final sample comprised of 45 students in the control group (C), 44 in experimental group (E1) and 46 in experimental group (E2). Finally, equal numbers represented by the first 27 scores from each group were analysed in order to get more accurate results through comparing symmetric groups in terms of the numbers of students in each group. Subsequently, interviews were carried out with seventy-one (71) students from all three groups; 20 students (28.2%) from the control group (C), 25 students (35.2%) from the first experimental group (E1), and 26 students (36.6%) from the second experimental group (E2), to support the study results. Data were analysed using SPSS. The study analysis involved first establishing whether the data followed a normal distribution. One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to compare students' achievements due to learning style and Independent Sample T-tests were utilised to discover if statistical evidence was significantly different. The findings revealed that collaborative learning had no beneficial effect on the students' exercises and poster skills or in their scores for the midterm exam. However, collaborative learning had a significant effect on the students' proposal writing scores. Other than that, collaborative learning had no effect on exam results including pre-test, post-test, midterm or final exam. Furthermore, the findings confirmed that there were significant differences in the post-test, midterm and final exam scores of students who undertook collaborative learning with the same learning style in a blended learning environment due to their learning style, with the converging learning style being associated with significantly higher scores. Thus, there was an effect on the post-test, midterm and final exam scores of students engaged in collaborative learning with the same learning style in a blended learning environment which was due to their learning style. On the other hand, differences in learning style had no significant effect on the achievements of collaborative learners in the exercises, proposal writing and poster task, or in the pre-exam. Also, results confirmed that in the control group, there was a significant difference in the students' pre-test, midterm and final exam scores in a blended learning environment due to learning style where collaborative learning did not occur. This difference was due to the learning style, with the assimilating learning style showing the best results. However, there was no significant difference in the students' scores for their exercises, proposal and poster skills or for their post-test in a blended learning environment due to learning style where collaborative learning did not occur. Regarding the first experimental group (E1), learning style had no significant effect on the students' skills and achievements (scores for the exercises, proposal and poster task, and for the pre-test, post-test, midterm and final exam) in a blended learning environment where collaborative learning occurred. The researcher recommends that e-learning centres be established in Qatar universities, distributed in specific centres in colleges, and that educationists who are specialised and qualified in collaborative learning styles be provided so that instruction on this type of learning is based on correct educational roots using precise scientific techniques.
Description: This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/15137
Appears in Collections:Education
Dept of Education Theses

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