Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/12785
Title: Rare diseases: matching wheelchair users with rare metabolic, neuromuscular or neurological disorders to electric powered indoor/outdoor wheelchairs (EPIOCs)
Authors: Desouza, LH
Frank, AO
Keywords: Assistive technology;Clinical features;Comorbidity;Friedreich's ataxia;Powered mobility;Rehabilitation
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Citation: Disability and Rehabilitation, 38(16): pp 1547-1556, (2016)
Abstract: Purpose: To describe the clinical features of electric powered indoor/outdoor wheelchair (EPIOC) users with rare diseases (RD) impacting on EPIOC provision and seating. Method: Retrospective review by a consultant in rehabilitation medicine of electronic and case note records of EPIOC recipients with RDs attending a specialist wheelchair service between June 2007 and September 2008. Data were systematically extracted, entered into a database and analysed under three themes; demographic, diagnostic/clinical (including comorbidity and associated clinical features (ACFs) of the illness/disability) and wheelchair factors. Results: Fifty-four (27 male) EPIOC users, mean age 37.3 (SD 18.6, range 11–70) with RDs were identified and reviewed a mean of 64 (range 0–131) months after receiving their wheelchair. Diagnoses included 27 types of RDs including Friedreich’s ataxia, motor neurone disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, arthrogryposis, cerebellar syndromes and others. Nineteen users had between them 36 comorbidities and 30 users had 44 ACFs likely to influence the prescription. Tilt-in-space was provided to 34 (63%) users and specialised seating to 17 (31%). Four users had between them complex control or interfacing issues. Conclusions: The complex and diverse clinical problems of those with RDs present unique challenges to the multiprofessional wheelchair team to maintain successful independent mobility and community living.
URI: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/09638288.2015.1106599
http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/12785
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2015.1106599
ISSN: 0963-8288
Appears in Collections:Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

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