Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/12654
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dc.contributor.authorOlowofoyeku, AA-
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:37:12Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:37:12Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationInternational and Comparative Law Quarterly, 65(4): pp. 895-926,(2016)en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-6895-
dc.identifier.urihttp://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ILQ-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/12654-
dc.description.abstractThis article addresses the issues attending common law collegiate courts’ engagements with allegations of bias within their own ranks. It will be argued that, in such cases, it would be inappropriate to involve the collegiate panel or any member thereof in the decision, since such involvement inevitably encounters difficulties. The common law’s dilemmas require drastic solutions, but the common law arguably is illequipped to implement the required change. The answer, it will be argued, is legislation.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.subjectBiasen_US
dc.subjectJudicial impartialityen_US
dc.subjectRecusalsen_US
dc.subjectCollegiate courtsen_US
dc.subjectFair hearingen_US
dc.titleBias in collegiate courtsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0020589316000300-
dc.relation.isPartOfInternational and Comparative Law Quarterly-
pubs.publication-statusAccepted-
Appears in Collections:Dept of Politics, History and Law Research Papers

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