Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/11522
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dc.contributor.authorRajan-Rankin, S-
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-27T11:33:49Z-
dc.date.available2015-08-20-
dc.date.available2015-10-27T11:33:49Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationCritical and Radical Social Work, 3(2): pp. 207 - 220, ( 2015)en_US
dc.identifier.issn2049-8608-
dc.identifier.issn2049-8675-
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/tpp/crsw/2015/00000003/00000002/art00003?token=005513deaf767232d45232b6d7a407b53576b66213e663568293c6c567e504f58762f466615d12e98950f-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/11522-
dc.description.abstractAnti-racist social work is at a crossroads: while on the one hand, racial binaries such as black/white, us/other and slave/master can be useful political tools to understand institutional racism, current contexts of multiculturalism raise questions about the continued relevance of race as a category for analysis. 'Newer' forms of racialised identities are emerging that need to be incorporated into a broader conceptualisation of non-colour-based race theory. In this article, these contradictions are explicated through a phenomenological study of embodied reflections on race, ethnicity and self-identity among social work students. Frantz Fanon's 'fact of blackness' provides an epistemic guide to this phenomenological study, providing a multi-layered examination of social work students' experiential accounts of their embodied identities, their colour, race, blackness, whiteness and sexuality and what this means for self-identity. Tentative student discourses provide powerful insights into the urgent need for a radical turn in (re)locating culture and race studies in the social work curriculum.en_US
dc.format.extent207 - 220-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPolicy Pressen_US
dc.subjectPost-raceen_US
dc.subjectEmbodimenten_US
dc.subjectAnti racist social worken_US
dc.titleAnti-racist social work in a 'post-race society'? Interrogating the amorphous 'other'en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204986015X14286590888439-
dc.relation.isPartOfCritical and Radical Social Work-
pubs.issue2-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
pubs.volume3-
Appears in Collections:Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

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