Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/11183
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dc.contributor.authorRussell, A-
dc.contributor.authorGohlan, M-
dc.contributor.authorSmedley, A-
dc.contributor.authorDensham, M-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-24T12:32:08Z-
dc.date.available2015-01-01-
dc.date.available2015-07-24T12:32:08Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationAntarctic Science, 27(3): 307 - 316, (June 2015)en_US
dc.identifier.issn0954-1020-
dc.identifier.issn1365-2079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9672851&fileId=S0954102014000790-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/11183-
dc.description.abstractPolysulphone ultraviolet dosimetry badges were deployed daily during a British Services Antarctic Expedition to the Antarctic Peninsula, including a cruise period across the Drake Passage. The expedition was undertaken from 20 December 2011 to 7 March 2012. Badges were successfully analysed from 46 days of the expedition with a daily mean of 1.8 kJ m<sup>-2</sup> erythemal daily dose (EDD) and a range of 0.3-4.3 kJ m<sup>-2</sup> EDD. The results indicate that the ultraviolet EDD experienced was comparable to temperate, mid-latitude locations in the spring/late summer. The variability of the badge measurements was mostly consistent with observations from a local ground-based radiometer and equivalent satellite-derived products. However, such comparisons are limited by the changing location/altitude of the expedition and known biases in the satellite data. This highlights that the new dataset of exposure experienced at the Antarctic surface complements those produced by stationary ground-based instruments or satellites and, therefore, that the badge dataset brings a new element to this issue. The highest EDD values during the expedition occurred at high altitude, and the lowest EDD values occurred at low altitude and high latitude with relatively high total ozone column concentration.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Royal Meteorological Society and the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers).en_US
dc.format.extent307 - 316-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.subjectUV dosimetryen_US
dc.subjectUV erythemal daily doseen_US
dc.subjectOzone depletionen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectLoubet coasten_US
dc.subjectAvery plateauen_US
dc.subjectBSAE 2012en_US
dc.titleThe ultraviolet radiation environment during an expedition across the Drake Passage and on the Antarctic Peninsulaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954102014000790-
dc.relation.isPartOfAntarctic Science-
pubs.issue3-
pubs.volume27-
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