Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/10032
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAnsell, Nicola-
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-30T13:02:02Z-
dc.date.available2015-01-30T13:02:02Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationAnsell N. Journal of Health Psychology, 19:1, 22-33, 2014en_US
dc.identifier.issn1359-1053-
dc.identifier.urihttp://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/10032-
dc.description.abstractCritics of empowerment have highlighted the concept’s mutability, focus on individual transformation, one-dimensionality and challenges of operationalisation. Relating these critiques to children’s empowerment raises new challenges. Drawing on scholarship on children’s subjecthood and exercise of power, alongside empirical research with children affected by AIDS, I argue that empowerment envisaged as individual self-transformation and increased capacity to act independently offers little basis for progressive change. Rather it is essential to adopt a relational approach that recognises the need to transform power relationships at multiple levels. This analysis has implications for our wider understanding of empowerment in the 21st century.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectMutabilityen_US
dc.subjectFocus on individual transformationen_US
dc.subjectOne-dimensionalityen_US
dc.subjectChallenges of operationalisationen_US
dc.titleChallenging empowerment: AIDS-affected southern African children and the need for a multi-level relational approachen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
Appears in Collections:Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Fulltext.pdf440.17 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in BURA are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.