Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/8979
Title: Problematic clinical features of powered wheelchair users with severely disabling multiple sclerosis
Authors: De Souza, LH
Frank, AO
Keywords: Assistive technology;Comorbidity;Mobility;Multiple sclerosis;Safety;Seating;Wheelchairs
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Informa Healthcare
Citation: Disability and Rehabilitation, Early online, 2014
Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to describe the clinical features of powered wheelchair users with severely disabling multiple sclerosis (MS) and explore the problematic clinical features influencing prescription. Method: Retrospective review of electronic and case note records of recipients of electric-powered indoor/outdoor powered wheelchairs (EPIOCs) attending a specialist wheelchair service between June 2007 and September 2008. Records were reviewed by a consultant in rehabilitation medicine, data systematically extracted and entered into a computer database. Further data were entered from clinical records. Data were extracted under three themes; demographic, diagnostic, clinical and wheelchair factors. Results: Records of 28 men mean age 57 (range 37–78, SD 12) years and 63 women mean age 57 (range 35–81, SD 11) years with MS were reviewed a mean of 64 (range 0–131) months after receiving their wheelchair. Twenty two comorbidities, 11 features of MS and 8 features of disability were thought to influence wheelchair prescription. Fifteen users were provided with specialised seating and 46 with tilt-in-space seats. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that people with severe MS requiring an EPIOC benefit from a holistic assessment to identify problematic clinical features that influence the prescription of the EPIOC and further medical and therapeutic interventions.
Description: This article is made available through the Brunel Open Access Publishing Fund. Copyright @ 2014 Informa UK Ltd.
URI: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09638288.2014.949356
http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/8979
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2014.949356
ISSN: 1464-5165
Appears in Collections:Physiotherapy
Brunel OA Publishing Fund
Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

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