Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/8403
Title: Men and infant feeding: Perceptions of embarrassment, sexuality, and social conduct in white low-income British men
Authors: Henderson, L
McMillan, B
Green, JM
Renfrew, MJ
Keywords: Breastfeeding;Embarrassment;Focus groups;Media;Men;Risk;Sexuality
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Birth: Issues in Perinatal Care, 38(1), 61 - 70, 2011
Abstract: Background:  The views of fathers have been shown to be important determinants of infant feeding decisions, but men’s perceptions of breastfeeding and formula feeding are rarely explored. Our objectives were to address this gap and examine cultural associations and beliefs concerning infant feeding practices among men. Methods:  Five focus groups were conducted with low-income men (n = 28) living in areas of social deprivation in Leeds, northeast of England, and low-income areas of Glasgow, west of Scotland. Participants were white British men, aged between 16 and 45 years, and included fathers, expectant fathers, and potential fathers. Results:  Overarching themes concerning sexuality, embarrassment, and social conduct were identified across all groups. Participants perceived breastfeeding as “natural” but problematic, whereas formula feeding was mainly considered as convenient and safe. Participants without direct experience of breastfeeding assumed that it involved excessive public exposure and attracted unwanted male attention. Underpinning these fears were strong cultural associations between breasts and sexuality and anxieties concerning appropriate gender roles. Conclusions:  In some communities few opportunities may occur to witness breastfeeding, and thus existing fears concerning the activity as attracting predatory male attention remain unchallenged. Perceptions of breastfeeding as a sexual activity and the dominant mass media emphasis on breasts as a sexual site may present additional obstacles to breastfeeding. Antenatal or perinatal education with men should address not only practical issues but also provide advice on tackling problems generated by wider sociocultural issues of sexuality and masculinity.
Description: Copyright @ 2010 The Authors. This is the accepted version of the following article: Henderson, L., McMillan, B., Green, J. M. and Renfrew, M. J. (2011), Men and Infant Feeding: Perceptions of Embarrassment, Sexuality, and Social Conduct in White Low-Income British Men. Birth, 38: 61–70, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1523-536X.2010.00442.x/abstract.
URI: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1523-536X.2010.00442.x/abstract
http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/8403
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-536X.2010.00442.x
ISSN: 0730-7659
Appears in Collections:Sociology
Publications
Dept of Social Sciences Media and Communications Research Papers

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