Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/13413
Title: Lentivirus-meditated frataxin gene delivery reverses genome instability in Friedreich ataxia patient and mouse model fibroblasts
Authors: Khonsari, H
Schneider, M
Al-Mahdawi, S
Chianea, YG
Themis, M
Parris, C
Pook, MA
Themis, M
Issue Date: 2016
Citation: Gene Therapy (2016)
Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by deficiency of frataxin protein, with the primary sites of pathology being the large sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia and the cerebellum. FRDA is also often accompanied by severe cardiomyopathy and diabetes mellitus. Frataxin is important in mitochondrial iron–sulfur cluster (ISC) biogenesis and low-frataxin expression is due to a GAA repeat expansion in intron 1 of the FXN gene. FRDA cells are genomically unstable, with increased levels of reactive oxygen species and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Here we report the identification of elevated levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in FRDA patient and YG8sR FRDA mouse model fibroblasts compared to normal fibroblasts. Using lentivirus FXN gene delivery to FRDA patient and YG8sR cells, we obtained long-term overexpression of FXN mRNA and frataxin protein levels with reduced DSB levels towards normal. Furthermore, γ-irradiation of FRDA patient and YG8sR cells revealed impaired DSB repair that was recovered on FXN gene transfer. This suggests that frataxin may be involved in DSB repair, either directly by an unknown mechanism, or indirectly via ISC biogenesis for DNA repair enzymes, which may be essential for the prevention of neurodegeneration.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/13413
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/gt.2016.61
ISSN: 1476-5462
Appears in Collections:Dept of Life Sciences Research Papers

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