Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/12640
Title: Looking to Learn: The Effects of Visual Guidance on Observational Learning of the Golf Swing
Authors: D'Innocenzo, G
Gonzalez, C
Williams, AM
Bishop, D
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: PLoS One
Abstract: Skilled performers exhibit more efficient gaze patterns than less-skilled counterparts do and they look more frequently at task-relevant regions than at superfluous ones. We examined whether we may guide novices’ gaze towards relevant regions during action observation in order to facilitate their learning of a complex motor skill. In a Pre-test-Post-test examination of changes in their execution of the full golf swing, 21 novices viewed one of three videos at intervention: i) a skilled golfer performing 10 swings (Free Viewing, FV); ii) the same video with transient colour cues superimposed to highlight key features of the golfer’s setup (Visual Guidance; VG); iii) or a History of Golf video (Control). Participants in the visual guidance group spent significantly more time looking at cued areas than did the other two groups, a phenomenon that persisted after the cues had been removed. Moreover, the visual guidance group improved their swing execution at Post-test and on a Retention test one week later. Our results suggest that visual guidance to cued areas during observational learning of complex motor skills may accelerate acquisition of the skill.
URI: http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/12640
ISSN: 1932-6203
Appears in Collections:Dept of Life Sciences Research Papers

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