Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/10600
Title: Religious faith and self-efficacy among stroke patients in Kuwait: Health professionals' views
Authors: Omu, O
Reynolds, F
Keywords: Fatalism;Kuwait;Religious coping;Religious faith;Self-efficacy;Stroke rehabilitation
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Informa Healthcare
Citation: Disability and Rehabilitation, 36(18): 1529 - 1535, (25 February 2014)
Abstract: Purpose: This study explored health professionals' views about the influence of Muslim religious beliefs on Kuwaiti patients' self-efficacy within stroke rehabilitation. It also explored their confidence in discussing religious issues with patients during rehabilitation. Method: Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 expatriate health professionals of various religious faiths working in stroke rehabilitation (five nurses, four physiotherapists and one physician). Data were analysed thematically. Findings: Health professionals considered that self-efficacy in stroke rehabilitation was strengthened by patients' feelings of partnership with God, which evoked hope and strength by retaining continuity of the moral self, and by viewing disability as a test of resilience. Fatalistic beliefs and the belief that stroke is a punishment from God were thought to undermine self-efficacy. Health professionals sought to foster patients' experience of religious empowerment by using religious phrases during rehabilitation, and encouraging religious observance. Nurse participants considered that discussing religious issues with their patients was intrinsic to culturally competent care. Conclusions: It is known that patients' self-efficacy in rehabilitation can be strengthened through a number of strategies such as goal-setting and feedback. This study suggests that for Muslim patients in Kuwait, health professionals also need to be mindful of their need for religious empowerment.
URI: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09638288.2014.892641
http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/10600
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2014.892641
ISSN: 0963-8288
1464-5165
Appears in Collections:Dept of Clinical Sciences Research Papers

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