Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://buratest.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/10129
Title: Moderate and heavy metabolic stress interval training improve arterial stiffness and heart rate dynamics in humans
Authors: Rakobowchuk, M
Harris, E
Taylor, A
Cubbon, RM
Birch, KM
Keywords: Heart rate variability;Arterial compliance;Exercise training;Arterial stiffness;Heart rate modulation;Interval
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: Springer
Citation: European Journal of Applied Physiology, 113:4, pp. 839 - 849, 2013
Abstract: Traditional continuous aerobic exercise training attenuates age-related increases of arterial stiffness, however, training studies have not determined whether metabolic stress impacts these favourable effects. Twenty untrained healthy participants (n = 11 heavy metabolic stress interval training, n = 9 moderate metabolic stress interval training) completed 6 weeks of moderate or heavy intensity interval training matched for total work and exercise duration. Carotid artery stiffness, blood pressure contour analysis, and linear and non-linear heart rate variability were assessed before and following training. Overall, carotid arterial stiffness was reduced (p < 0.01), but metabolic stress-specific alterations were not apparent. There was a trend for increased absolute high-frequency (HF) power (p = 0.10) whereas both absolute low-frequency (LF) power (p = 0.05) and overall power (p = 0.02) were increased to a similar degree following both training programmes. Non-linear heart rate dynamics such as detrended fluctuation analysis [Formula: see text] also improved (p > 0.05). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of interval training at improving arterial stiffness and autonomic function, however, the metabolic stress was not a mediator of this effect. In addition, these changes were also independent of improvements in aerobic capacity, which were only induced by training that involved a high metabolic stress.
URI: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00421-012-2486-6
http://bura.brunel.ac.uk/handle/2438/10129
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-012-2486-6
ISSN: 1439-6327
Appears in Collections:Sport
Dept of Life Sciences Research Papers

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